David Copperfield by Charles Dickens

This is a horror novel more than anything and the way Copperfield’s childhood unfolded was one of the most disturbing things I’ve ever read. I feel like it would be easier to update this blog if I had either a laptop or desktop with a comfortable chair, instead of using my cellphone with a smashed screen. I also feel it would be easier to update if I hadn’t resumed my long-distance running. After running which I do first thing after I get up, I feel a bit sore and just want to do easy things. Finally, I should update it more if I had more readers. All in good time I suppose. Rome wasn’t built in a day and the journey of a thousand miles begins with a single step, etc. Charles Dickens’ books are very edifying, both his genius command of the English language which he displays with mellifluous verbosity and because of the time period itself, there being no TV, video games, etc in the Victorian Era and no fixed price system either, most Victorian authors, especially Dickens seem highly aware of economics and reality. There is something game theoretic about Dickens novels which I enjoy. He is a master psychologist being able to describe and convey the nuances and complexities of his characters feelings and motivations. The copy I read was the unabridged Dover giant thrift edition, published in 2004 which a retail price of $5. Although David Copperfield was published from May 1849 to November 1850 and this edition has a painting from 1818 on the cover, it’s still rather impressive they were able to bring this massive book to market for only $5 even back in 2004.

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